16 Qualities of Company Culture and Benefits that Attract Talent

By Chevas Balloun

Last Updated: May 19th 2024

How to research a company’s culture and benefits.

If you’re looking to work in the tech industry, the technical aspects of the job are important.

But when it comes to a company’s culture and benefits, developers are the same as other employees.

What’s important is different for everyone.

And the priorities of what’s important will change over the course of a career.

Let’s look at some popular qualities of company culture.

It’s important to note that organizations don’t need to offer all of these to be considered ethical, competent, compassionate, and generous.

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16 qualities of company culture that attract talent

Listed in no specific order since priority is an individual preference.

  • Training & employee development
    • A company that invests in the development of its employees will have more satisfied employees. And more satisfied employees are more productive, and less likely to leave for another company.
  • Work/life balance
    • Employees need to be able to disengage from work. It’s crucial that they have time to focus on everything else that’s important to them: family, friends, hobbies etc.
  • Supportive supervisor
    • Knowing your boss has your back is a great feeling.
    • Knowing your boss trusts you is a great feeling.
    • Knowing your boss will remove any obstacles in the way of your success is a great feeling.
    • There’s a saying that people leave bosses not companies.
    • The relationship with your supervisor can make or break a satisfying career.
  • Supportive co-workers
    • Given the number of hours we work, we sometimes spend more time with co-workers than with some family members.
    • The importance of supportive, pleasant, respectful relationships with your peers cannot be understated.
  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
  • Mission & reputation
    • The company mission statement should be easy to find on the website.
    • Each employer’s mission is different. But it should speak to their values, so you know if they align with yours.
    • For example: Perhaps environmental practices are important to you, such as a paperless office, or residing in a green building.
  • Community philanthropy
    • All partnerships and community outreach programs should be listed on the website.
    • All philanthropic programs should also be detailed on their site.
  • Job security (company stability)
    • Is the company profitable?
    • Are they expected to grow?
    • Any recent layoffs?
    • How many open positions do they currently have?
  • Business hours & Work Schedule
    • Are there circumstances when you’d be expected to work off-hours? It’s common for software releases to occur at night on weekends when system usage is low.
    • Is the work schedule dayshift, nightshift, or weekends?
  • Commute
    • Is remote or hybrid work an option?
    • Can you go into the office if that’s your preference?
    • Does the company pay for relocation expenses?
    • Is there parking, or convenient public transportation?
  • Flexible work schedule
    • Is there flexibility on when you start your day, and when you end it?
    • Or do you earn this over time as you deliver high-quality projects on time and on budget?
    • Obviously, you need to be available when meetings are scheduled.
  • Employee recognition
    • Why are employees recognized? (For years of service? For specific projects?)
    • How are employees recognized? (Company ceremonies? Bonuses?)
  • Communication
    • How often and in what format does leadership communicate updates to employees?
    • Are employees receiving communication in weekly email, or in a monthly Zoom meeting?
  • Opportunities for career advancement
    • Are upward or lateral mobility options clearly stated?
    • Are the various career path levels of a specific job documented?
    • Are the criteria to move up to the next level clear?
  • Workload
    • Understanding there are times when urgent and unexpected tasks arise, but are these the norm or the exception?
    • Are employees consistently feeling like they’re behind on their work because the workload is unreasonable and unmanageable?
  • Full-time, part-time, job-sharing positions.
    • Is there a variety of job schedules to accommodate various life responsibilities?

16 benefits companies can offer to attract talent

Listed in no specific order since priority is an individual preference.

  • Competitive salary & bonuses
  • Paid Time Off (PTO) – unlimited PTO is becoming more popular
  • Frequency of work appraisal and salary increases (annual?)
  • Retirement plans (employer matches, 401k, pensions)
  • Stock options
  • Health insurance -including vision & dental, health savings account (HSA), flexible spending account (FSA)
  • Short-term and long-term disability pay
  • Life insurance
  • Tuition reimbursement
  • Student loan forgiveness (Does the company qualify?)
  • Paid medical leave (for self and caring for family members)
  • Childcare assistance
  • Employee assistance program (EAP)
  • Paid sabbaticals (X weeks off every Y years?) – rare but more companies are offering these because of the great resignation.
  • Full or partial reimbursement for personal expenses such as gym membership/equipment, computer equipment, etc.
  • Other unique perks (discount public transportation pass, pet-friendly office, free food etc.)

Fill this form to download every syllabus from Nucamp.

And learn about Nucamp's Coding Bootcamps and why aspiring developers choose us.

*By checking "I Agree", you are opting-in to receive information, including text messages from Nucamp. You also agree to the following Terms of use, SMS Terms of use & Privacy Policy. Reply STOP to stop receiving text messages.

7 ways to research a potential employer

  1. View the company website
    • Read the mission statement.
    • Check the About Us page to see and learn about the leadership.
    • Is there diversity in their workforce, and in their leadership?
    • If they have an “In the news” section, read it.
  2. Research on-line news and publications
  3. Better Business Bureau
    • BBB.org lists complaints publicly
  4. LinkedIn Profiles
    • Check the company’s LinkedIn profile page.
    • Check the LinkedIn profile pages of company leadership.
    • Is there’s a lot of employee turnover?
    • Is anyone in your LinkedIn network affiliated with the company who you can consult?
  5. Not everyone’s social media pages are private.
    • Check out their Facebook page.
    • They’ve probably already looked at yours.
  6. Ask questions during the interview.
    • What’s the best part of working here?
    • How does the company measure individual success?
    • What surprises new hires the most once they start working here?
  7. Observations during your interview if it is in-person and on-site.
    • Glimpse around the office at your interview.
    • Do people look happy?

 

Key Takeaways:

Never stop looking for that dream company.

The one that invests in you and your future plans, whatever they may be.

The one whose mission aligns with your values.

The one you can be proud to work for.

Nucamp’s mission

If you’ve dreamed of a career in tech, Nucamp is dedicated to making that dream come true.

Our coding bootcamps are the most affordable in the industry to learn to code.

Once you graduate, we’ll also assist you in your job search.

Our course schedules are part-time and flexible, so you don’t have to quit your job to attend.

And in some cases, your employer will pay for your bootcamp.

To start your career change, please schedule a call with a Nucamp advisor.

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Chevas Balloun

Director of Marketing & Brand

Chevas has spent over 15 years inventing brands, designing interfaces, and driving engagement for companies like Microsoft. He is a practiced writer, a productivity app inventor, board game designer, and has a builder-mentality drives entrepreneurship.